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Long-term test: Subaru Legacy 2.0-litre – on sale now

Subaru

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Review

The Legacy is a smart saloon that’s fun to drive and large enough to fit four adults, plus all their luggage, with ease.

From the outside, it’s impressive without being overpowering, gathering a few admiring glances when I drove it around Norwich city centre, and inside the car feels spacious and is very comfortable.

The ride is incredibly smooth, even around Norfolk’s B roads, and was commented on many times. Its twin exhausts give it a sporty feel and the engine is quick enough to match.

The handling feels secure and the brakes responsive, making the ride exciting and a bit of an adventure.

Its powerful, easily-adjustable air conditioning system, which comes as standard, was very welcome in the hot summer months.

The only downside for me came from the one-button keyring, which does everything from opening the boot to setting the alarm.

I found it a bit confusing to use and dealers should take the time to explain it to customers.

In its sector, the Legacy faces stiff competition from the Ford Mondeo and the Vauxhall Vectra, both of which are similarly priced and well established in the market. To the end of July 30,956 Mondeos and 29,998 Vectras were sold in the UK, compared to 746 Legacies.

Though this puts the Legacy firmly in the niche-end of saloons, the car can be sold to those who are tied to the more traditional brands.

A long test drive and a run down of the standard specifications should be enough to sway those who would consider buying one.

Price: £17,020
Engine: 2.0-litre, 4cyl Boxer; 162bhp @ 6,800rpm, 138lb ft @ 3,200rpm
Performance: 0-62mph 9.2sec; top speed 133mph
Test period: April-September
Start mileage: 150
Current mileage: 6,126
Efficiency: 32.5mpg (combined); 207g/km CO2
CAP RV 3yr/30k: £5,700 (34%)
CAP RV 3yr/60k: £4,800 (29%)
Likes: Smart styling, nice to drive
Dislikes: One button keyring

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